Blog

Posts Tagged new computer

How to Diagnose a Computer Problem: 10 Quick Steps

computer diagnosis

How to Diagnose a Computer Problem
Edited by Cameron, Brandywine, R1zen187, Username152 and 11 others

Many people are faced with everyday computer problems that are easy to fix, but are unable to diagnose the actual problem. While there are many problems a computer will be faced with, this article will tell you where to look for common problems.

EditSteps
1Check the POST. POST stands for Power On Self Test. This is generally the first or second thing that appears on a computer after turning on the power. This appears before the operating system begins to load. The POST will display any problems found with hardware that makes the computer unable to boot, POST may also display problems with hardware that allow the computer to boot, but not operate at its full capacity during operation.

2Notice the load time of the OS (operating system). A longer than usual load time may indicate seek errors (or other errors) in the hard drive.
3Notice any graphics problems once the OS has loaded. Reduced graphics may indicate driver failures or hardware failures with graphic cards.
4Perform an auditory test. An auditory test is an unorthodox, but still effective way of judging how hard a computer is working. With the computer on and running, play any decent length audio file (usually above 30 secs). If the audio is choppy or slow, it usually means that the processor is working at an elevated level, or there is not enough RAM to run all programs loading. Changing the startup sound is a great way to apply this test. Another issue associated with choppy sounds is PIO (Programmed Input/Output) Mode. This affects how the hard drive reads and writes data from a drive. Switching to DMA allows for faster reads and writes, and can sometimes repair choppy audio.
5Check any newly installed hardware. Many operating systems, especially Windows, can conflict with new drivers. The driver may be badly written, or it may conflict with another process. Windows will usually notify you about devices that are causing a problem, or have a problem. To check this use the Device Manager, this can be accessed by entering the Control Panel, clicking the System icon, clicking the Hardware tab, and clicking on Device Manager. Use this to check and arrange the properties of hardware.
6Check any newly installed software. Software may require more resources than the system can provide. Chances are that if a problem begins after software starts, the software is causing it. If the problem appears directly upon startup, it may be caused by software that starts automatically on boot.
7Check RAM and CPU consumption. A common problem is a choppy or sluggish system. If a system is choppy it is good practice to see if a program is consuming more resources than the computer can provide. An easy way to check this is to use the Task Manager, right click on the taskbar select Task Manager, and click the Processes tab. The CPU column contains a number that indicates the percentage of CPU the process is consuming. The Mem Usage column indicates how much memory a process is consuming.
8Listen to the computer, if the hard drive is scratching or making loud noises, shut off the computer and have a professional diagnose the hard drive. Listen to the CPU fan, this comes on a high speed when the CPU is working hard, and can tell you when the computer is working beyond its capacity.
9Run a virus and malware scan. Performance problems can be caused by malware on the computer. Running a virus scan can unearth any problems. Use a commonly updated virus scanner (such as Norton Antivirus or Avast! Antivirus) and a commonly updated malware scanner (such as Spybot Search & Destroy).
10Check for the problem in safe mode. As a last ditch effort, check the problem in safe mode. To enter safe mode, tap F8 repeatedly during POST (this works on most systems). If the problem persists in safe mode, it is a fair bet that the operating system itself is to blame.

This article was taken from the following site: http://www.wikihow.com/Diagnose-a-Computer-Problem

Posted in: Latest Computer News

Leave a Comment (0) →

When is it the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC?

When is the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC? - Chris Pirillo

Do you upgrade your computer yearly? How about monthly? Do you upgrade only when your current system breaks down or stops running the newest applications? There is a big debate among computer users as to when the best, and most cost-effective time is to upgrade. In a recent discussion, Brandon and Jake were asked the question, “When is it time to upgrade your PC?”

Brandon believes in upgrading your system components, rather than buying a new computer every time new technology becomes available. By keeping track of when Intel and/or AMD come out with a new socket, he is able to determine whether or not a new motherboard needs to be purchased when buying a new processor.

Jake, on the other hand, buys an entirely new system yearly. By doing this, he enjoys an entire set of updated features including bigger hard drives, newer optical drive technology, and faster processing without the hassle of having to buy new individual pieces.

For most users, a simple upgrade here and there to a desktop PC on a regular basis can be enough to for them to get by for years. Costs are relatively low in comparison, and you have more ability to get exactly what you need, rather than what the OEM is willing to include.

A gamer might find a yearly total upgrade more cost-effective given the somewhat low prices for bundled hardware available today. Video cards, RAM, CPU, Motherboards, and sound cards all fall under a serious gamer’s radar in terms of desired performance increase.

While there are certain advantages to each camp in this seemingly eternal debate between geeks, one thing mostly everyone can agree on is that maintaining a basic knowledge of current technologies can come in handy when it does come time to pick up new hardware. Knowing the advantages to SSD over a traditional drive can help determine whether or not the investment is ultimately worthwhile.

If you decide to upgrade components rather than an entire system, keep in mind that everything needs to be compatible. Buying a SATA drive for a motherboard that only supports older connections can cause a real headache as users discover the incompatibility. More modern PC memory may not be recognized or run properly in an older motherboard. An out-of-date BIOS can fail to recognize newer components entirely, which may result in the appearance of broken hardware when a simple update can resolve the problem entirely.

What do you think? When is it time to upgrade your PC? Please leave a comment below with your opinion on the topic.

This article was found at the following:  When is the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC? – Chris Pirillo.

Posted in: Latest Computer News

Leave a Comment (0) →