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How to enable Developer Options on your Android phone or tablet | Greenbot

How to enable Developer Options on your Android phone or tablet

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Credit: Blake Stimac

By Blake Stimac Follow

Greenbot | Jul 25, 2014 6:00 AM

Android How-To

So you’ve finally decided to root your phone and install a custom ROM, or maybe you want to sideload an app from your computer. Before you can jump into ADB commands and perform some software surgery on your phone, you have to enable the Developer options.

Cleverly hidden away from the average user, enabling Developer options is incredibly easy to do if you know where to look.

Find the Android Build number in Settings

Build number menu for the Samsung Galaxy S5, LG G3, and HTC One (M8)

While enabling Developer Options is done in the same way for every Android phone or tablet, OEMs don’t always put the option in the same place. Navigate your phone to the “Build number” portion of the settings, which can be tucked away and buried in submenus.

Here’s how to get there on a few popular devices:

Stock Android: Settings > About phone > Build number

Samsung Galaxy S5: Settings > About device > Build number

LG G3: Settings > About phone > Software information > Build number

HTC One (M8): Settings > About > Software information > More > Build number

Once you’ve found the Build number section of the settings, tap on the section 7 times. After two taps, a small pop up notification should appear saying “you are now X steps away from being a developer” with a number that counts down with every additional tap.

When the Developer options are unlocked, you should see something like this.

After the 7th tap, the Developer options will be unlocked and available. They can usually be found in the main settings menu. You dive into that menu to do things like enable USB debugging (a frequent prerequisite to lots of hacks).

Developer options for the Samsung Galaxy S5, LG G3, and HTC One (M8).

Removing Developer options is possible, but only for certain phones

So you want to get rid of the developer options in the settings menu of your phone? Well, the sad truth is that the only sure-fire way to do this is to perform a factory reset. Luckily, a few phones can kill off the extra settings menu without wiping the phone completely.

Clearing the Settings data will remove Developer options for some phones and tablets.

If you have a phone with stock Android or the HTC One (M8), Developer options can be removed completely from your phone without wiping it. Sorry, Galaxy S5 and LG G3 users, you’re gonna need to either live with the extra menu or wipe your phone.

Go to Settings>Apps>Settings and tap on Clear Data. A popup will ask you to confirm, press OK, and you’re done. This method may work with more phones and tablets, so be sure to let us know in the comments below if it worked for you.

Blake Stimac — Staff Writer

Blake has been an Android fan since the G1 days, tinkering with any device he can get his hands on. When he’s not geeking out on Android devices, you’ll likely find him playing video games or watching a laundry list of horror movies.

via How to enable Developer Options on your Android phone or tablet | Greenbot.

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How to fix jerky YouTube video in GoogleChrome

How to fix jerky YouTube video in Google Chrome

 

Lately I’ve noticed that whenever I play a YouTube video on my PC, it’s jerky. Choppy. Call it what you will—it’s really frustrating.

Semi-expert troubleshooter that I am, I did what I always do when experiencing a problem inside my browser: I tried a different browser. Specifically, I switched out of Chrome and into Internet Explorer.

And what do you know? Silky-smooth YouTube video. Google Chrome, j’accuse! 

After a little research into the issue, I discovered a fix—one that worked for me. Your mileage may vary, of course, because each system and situation is different, but it’s definitely worth a try if you’re plagued by the same choppy playback in Chrome. Do this:

1. Open a new tab in Chrome.

2. In the address bar, type about:plugins, then press Enter.

3. In the upper-right corner of the window, locate and click the plus sign next to Details.

4. Look for Adobe Flash Player, which on my system was the top entry. Immediately below that, you should see two Shockwave Flash entries. Look at the Location lines for both; you want the one that references PepperFlash. (Again, on my system, this was the first of the two. It looked like this:

C:\Users\Aspire8950\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\Application\ 24.0.1312.52\PepperFlash\pepflashplayer.dll)

5. Once you find that entry, click Disable.

6. Exit Chrome, wait a few seconds for it to fully terminate, and then restart it.

Now your YouTube videos should play much more smoothly. (If you run into playback problems, you may need to reinstall Adobe Shockwave. I didn’t encounter this issue, but a few users reported it.)

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at [email protected], or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PCWorld ForumsSign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

via ▶HowtofixjerkyYouTubevideoinGoogleChromeTechHive.

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‘Operation Hangover’ hackers exploit latest Windows zero-day – Computerworld

‘Operation Hangover’ hackers exploit latest Windows zero-day

Indian gang ups its game with targeted attacks that rely on malicious Word docs

By Gregg Keizer

November 7, 2013 10:47 AM ET

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Computerworld – The unpatched vulnerability in Windows that Microsoft acknowledged on Tuesday has been used by a known Indian hacker group responsible for earlier "Operation Hangover" attacks, security company Symantec said yesterday.

The gang behind Operation Hangover is believed to be based in India, and the bulk of the first round of cyber-espionage attacks, which were discovered in May, were aimed at its neighbor and long-time adversary Pakistan.

"After analyzing the payloads being used in this attack, we have identified that the targeted emails are part of an attack campaign known as Operation Hangover," Symantec said in a blog, referring to the newest campaign that relies on the Microsoft zero-day vulnerability to hijack and infect Windows PCs.

Microsoft issued a security alert Tuesday, saying that a vulnerability in the TIFF image-format parsing component of Windows was being exploited in attacks aimed at targets in the Middle East and South Asia, the latter region representing countries like India and Pakistan.

The attacks Symantec captured used malicious Word documents attached to emails with subject headings such as "Illegal Authorization for Funds Transfer" and "Problem with Credit September 26th 2013."

It was the first time that the Hangover group has used a zero-day vulnerability in its attacks, Symantec said.

Researcher Haifei Li of security company McAfee was the first to find and report the unpatched bug to Microsoft. The Redmond, Wash., company’s security team was alerted of the vulnerability Oct. 31.

According to Li, the exploit uses multiple XML objects to "spray the heap memory," a technique more than a decade old, to uncover sections of memory suitable for use by the actual attack code.

"It is worth [noting] that this heap-spraying in Office via ActiveX objects is a new exploitation trick which we [haven’t] seen before," Li wrote earlier this week.

Microsoft’s own researchers confirmed the ActiveX-based head-spray tactic in a detailed description published on its Security Research & Defense blog Tuesday.

This article, ‘Operation Hangover’ hackers exploit latest Windows zero-day, was originally published at Computerworld.com.

via 'Operation Hangover' hackers exploit latest Windows zero-day – Computerworld.

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How to Diagnose a Computer Problem: 10 Quick Steps

computer diagnosis

How to Diagnose a Computer Problem
Edited by Cameron, Brandywine, R1zen187, Username152 and 11 others

Many people are faced with everyday computer problems that are easy to fix, but are unable to diagnose the actual problem. While there are many problems a computer will be faced with, this article will tell you where to look for common problems.

EditSteps
1Check the POST. POST stands for Power On Self Test. This is generally the first or second thing that appears on a computer after turning on the power. This appears before the operating system begins to load. The POST will display any problems found with hardware that makes the computer unable to boot, POST may also display problems with hardware that allow the computer to boot, but not operate at its full capacity during operation.

2Notice the load time of the OS (operating system). A longer than usual load time may indicate seek errors (or other errors) in the hard drive.
3Notice any graphics problems once the OS has loaded. Reduced graphics may indicate driver failures or hardware failures with graphic cards.
4Perform an auditory test. An auditory test is an unorthodox, but still effective way of judging how hard a computer is working. With the computer on and running, play any decent length audio file (usually above 30 secs). If the audio is choppy or slow, it usually means that the processor is working at an elevated level, or there is not enough RAM to run all programs loading. Changing the startup sound is a great way to apply this test. Another issue associated with choppy sounds is PIO (Programmed Input/Output) Mode. This affects how the hard drive reads and writes data from a drive. Switching to DMA allows for faster reads and writes, and can sometimes repair choppy audio.
5Check any newly installed hardware. Many operating systems, especially Windows, can conflict with new drivers. The driver may be badly written, or it may conflict with another process. Windows will usually notify you about devices that are causing a problem, or have a problem. To check this use the Device Manager, this can be accessed by entering the Control Panel, clicking the System icon, clicking the Hardware tab, and clicking on Device Manager. Use this to check and arrange the properties of hardware.
6Check any newly installed software. Software may require more resources than the system can provide. Chances are that if a problem begins after software starts, the software is causing it. If the problem appears directly upon startup, it may be caused by software that starts automatically on boot.
7Check RAM and CPU consumption. A common problem is a choppy or sluggish system. If a system is choppy it is good practice to see if a program is consuming more resources than the computer can provide. An easy way to check this is to use the Task Manager, right click on the taskbar select Task Manager, and click the Processes tab. The CPU column contains a number that indicates the percentage of CPU the process is consuming. The Mem Usage column indicates how much memory a process is consuming.
8Listen to the computer, if the hard drive is scratching or making loud noises, shut off the computer and have a professional diagnose the hard drive. Listen to the CPU fan, this comes on a high speed when the CPU is working hard, and can tell you when the computer is working beyond its capacity.
9Run a virus and malware scan. Performance problems can be caused by malware on the computer. Running a virus scan can unearth any problems. Use a commonly updated virus scanner (such as Norton Antivirus or Avast! Antivirus) and a commonly updated malware scanner (such as Spybot Search & Destroy).
10Check for the problem in safe mode. As a last ditch effort, check the problem in safe mode. To enter safe mode, tap F8 repeatedly during POST (this works on most systems). If the problem persists in safe mode, it is a fair bet that the operating system itself is to blame.

This article was taken from the following site: http://www.wikihow.com/Diagnose-a-Computer-Problem

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Ubuntu 13.10 Review: A great Linux desktop gets better | ZDNet

MUST READ: Ubuntu 13.10 Review: A great Linux desktop gets betterTopic: Ubuntu Compare Follow via: RSSEmail Alert98Comments17 Votes19inSharemore +Ubuntu 13.10 Review: A great Linux desktop gets betterSummary: Ubuntu 13.10 may not be the most exciting desktop Linux, but it is very solid and contains many useful new features.By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols for Linux and Open Source | October 10, 2013 — 17:47 GMT 10:47 PDTMany hardcore desktop fans still havent forgiven Ubuntu for switching to its Unity interface. Others dislike how Canonical, Ubuntus parent company, has gone its own way with such technical issues as working on the Mir display stack instead of the more mainstream Wayland. And, some people dislike how Ubuntu is combining "local" searches with Web searches. So what!Ubuntu 13.10 launches next week. Heres an early review.Heres all that really matters. Back in April 2011, Ubuntus founder, Mark Shuttleworth said that the purpose of Ubuntus new path was "to bring the joys and freedoms and innovation and performance and security that have always been part of the Linux platform, to a consumer audience."  Hes done it.Sure, Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander, which has just gone into its final release candidate stage, isnt a desktop Linux that a Linux techie who still compiles his or her kernels from source code can love. But, its not meant to be that kind of desktop.See SlideshowUbuntu 13.10: A desktop tourRead moreIts meant to be a Linux desktop that anyone, say my now 81-year old mother-in-law can use. From that standpoint Ubuntu has been a success and this one week from final release version is even more of a win for people who just want to use a computer without tears.To see how it was doing this time, Ive been running the Ubuntu beta and the release candidate on two test systems. The first test box was my 2007 Dell Inspiron 530S, which is powered by a 2.2-GHz Intel Pentium E2200 dual-core processor. This PC has 4GBs of RAM, a 500GB SATA Serial ATA drive, and an Integrated Intel 3100 GMA Graphics Media Accelerator chip set. The second was a 2008-vintage Gateway DX4710. This PC is powered by a 2.5-GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor, 6GBs of RAM, a 1TB SATA drive, and an Intel GMA 3100 for graphics.Installation was a cinch on all these systems. While I didnt try to install Ubuntu on a system locked down with Windows 8 Secure Boot, there are good instructions on how to put Ubuntu on Windows 8 PCs and other systems that use Unified Extensible Firmware Interface UEFI.One nice new feature about the installation is that during it, youre asked to either login or open a free Ubuntu One cloud service account. Ubuntu One is a Dropbox-like storage service which comes with 5GBs of no-cost storage. The commercial version, at $39.95, gives you 20GBs of storage and music streaming. While this service works hand-in-glove with Ubuntu you can also its storage from Windows, Mac OS, Android and iOS.The first thing I noticed once I had it installed was that on both of these older systems, Ubuntu 13.10 ran like a top. If you have an older PC of your own and youre concerned about its fast approaching XP expiration date, keep in mind that Ubuntu, and other easy-to-use Linux distributions such as Mint run just fine on hardware that Windows 7 and above might find too slow.Looking under the hood, heres what I found. First, the Saucy Salamander is running the Linux 3.11 kernel.

via Ubuntu 13.10 Review: A great Linux desktop gets better | ZDNet.

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GTAV pushes Xbox 360, PS3 to the limits, says Rockstar

GTAV pushes Xbox 360, PS3 to the limits, says Rockstar

By Eddie Makuch, News Editor

Rockstar North president Leslie Benzies says “we’ve squeezed every single ounce of power” out of the consoles for upcoming open-world action game.

Grand Theft Auto V will push the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 to their technical limits, according to Rockstar North president Leslie Benzies.

Speaking with GameSpot, Benzies said, “We wanted to push these consoles to their limit. I think we’ve squeezed every single ounce of power out of these boxes that we can.”

The developer has said previously that GTAV not only represents the largest game Rockstar North has ever created, but also the most finely detailed. Theplacement of every tree in the gameworld has been considered, according to the developer.

GTAV will require a mandatory 8GB install on Xbox 360 and PS3. On Xbox 360, the game will ship on two discs, though players will not need to swap them at any time during gameplay.

Benzies also addressed Rockstar North’s general ambitions for GTAV, which launches in just over one month on September 17.

“Our goal was to simulate what’s outside [in the real world], to make it feel good, and tidy up all the rough edges that we thought GTAIV had,” Benzies said. “It was to get it so the handling feels perfect, the gunplay feels perfect. And also the online side of it–that’s been a goal for years. We’ve started it a few times before, but we’ve never finished it. That’s what we wanted to do, basically.”

Check out GameSpot’s full interview with Benzies for more, as well as ahands-on preview of GTA Online.

This article was taken from the following: GTAV pushes Xbox 360, PS3 to the limits, says Rockstar – GameSpot.com.

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5 tips to keep you cyber-safe this buying season | Computerworld Blogs

5 tips to keep you cyber-safe this buying season

By David A. Milman
November 30, 2010 10:35 AM EST

5 tips to keep you cyber-safe this buying season | Computerworld Blogs

Black Friday and Cyber Monday may mark the high points of the holiday shopping season, but they are by no means the end of it.  In a still struggling economy, with everyone searching for value, consumers will encounter technology deals that might seem too good to be true.

As reported by the Dow Jones newswires, online shopping may well top $1 billion dollars on a single day this year.  With more and more consumers willing to spend money online, sales will rise, but so will the risk of exposure to some sort of scam or cyber-crime right alongside those fabulous deals.

So, how can you avoid being taken advantage of?

There are many ways to keep yourself, your privacy, and your money safe this holiday season.  But, as the countdown to Christmas grows shorter, many of us abandon our common sense in the desperate pursuit of that one great gift or that one fantastic deal.

Therein lies the problem.  The number one way to guard against online scams is to employ some common sense.

For example, many of us will go to extreme lengths to save a few dollars.  This often includes venturing off the ‘beaten path’ and looking outside the major retailers on online auction or classified sites such as E-Bay or Craigslist, which the Better Business Bureau has cautioned against.  While many of the deals offered on such sites are perfectly legitimate, the likelihood of stumbling into a scam is far greater on these sorts of sites.

Tip #1 — If a deal seems too greatit probably is, especially if it’s from an individual user or a ‘minor’ retailer.  Be suspicious of any deal or sale that you can’t believe is real.  Maybe you’ve found the best buy of the season, but it’s more likely that you’ve stumbled into a scam set up to defraud you and steal your money or information.

It’s also important to remember that anyone you do business with online knows more about Internet commerce — and its dangers — than you do.

An excellent tip #2 is to do some research about any online vendor you’re considering making a purchase from.  Some vendors believe quality customer service goes hand in hand with turning a profit.  Others, however, such asVitaly Borker, seem to value their bottom line over the satisfaction of their customers.

As reported in the New York Times and on Cnet.com, Borker took advantage of loopholes in credit card policies to refuse refunds and threaten customers.  Only when he was in danger of being cut off by Visa and MasterCard did Borker begin meeting his customer’s needs.

Some simple research might have tipped customers off that Borker’s website was one to be avoided.

As heinous as Borker’s actions may seem, they do bring to light tip #3 for the online shopper: understand your credit cards.  Borker and other merchants like him, were able to take advantage of customers because of the rules set up by the credit cards those customers use.

With credit card purchases being the dominant form of online shopping, it’s vital that consumers know the policies of the cards they use and what recourse they have should those policies be abused.

Tip #4 — Consumers would also be wise to investigate other forms of payment, such as PayPal or Bill Me Later, a PayPal service.  While alternative methods may not offer the convenience of credit cards, they may provide more security against potential scams and those who know how to abuse the system.

Regardless of where and when you shop online, tip #5 applies: be cautious.  The Internet can be a dangerous place at the best of times.  During the often stressful and expensive holiday season the dangers increase exponentially.

Be wary every time you shop online and help to make sure this time remains a time of giving, and not of taking.

This article was cited from: http://blogs.computerworld.com/17440/safe_cyber_shopping_tips_for_the_holiday_season 

David A. Milman, Founder and CEO of Rescuecom

 

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When is it the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC?

When is the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC? - Chris Pirillo

Do you upgrade your computer yearly? How about monthly? Do you upgrade only when your current system breaks down or stops running the newest applications? There is a big debate among computer users as to when the best, and most cost-effective time is to upgrade. In a recent discussion, Brandon and Jake were asked the question, “When is it time to upgrade your PC?”

Brandon believes in upgrading your system components, rather than buying a new computer every time new technology becomes available. By keeping track of when Intel and/or AMD come out with a new socket, he is able to determine whether or not a new motherboard needs to be purchased when buying a new processor.

Jake, on the other hand, buys an entirely new system yearly. By doing this, he enjoys an entire set of updated features including bigger hard drives, newer optical drive technology, and faster processing without the hassle of having to buy new individual pieces.

For most users, a simple upgrade here and there to a desktop PC on a regular basis can be enough to for them to get by for years. Costs are relatively low in comparison, and you have more ability to get exactly what you need, rather than what the OEM is willing to include.

A gamer might find a yearly total upgrade more cost-effective given the somewhat low prices for bundled hardware available today. Video cards, RAM, CPU, Motherboards, and sound cards all fall under a serious gamer’s radar in terms of desired performance increase.

While there are certain advantages to each camp in this seemingly eternal debate between geeks, one thing mostly everyone can agree on is that maintaining a basic knowledge of current technologies can come in handy when it does come time to pick up new hardware. Knowing the advantages to SSD over a traditional drive can help determine whether or not the investment is ultimately worthwhile.

If you decide to upgrade components rather than an entire system, keep in mind that everything needs to be compatible. Buying a SATA drive for a motherboard that only supports older connections can cause a real headache as users discover the incompatibility. More modern PC memory may not be recognized or run properly in an older motherboard. An out-of-date BIOS can fail to recognize newer components entirely, which may result in the appearance of broken hardware when a simple update can resolve the problem entirely.

What do you think? When is it time to upgrade your PC? Please leave a comment below with your opinion on the topic.

This article was found at the following:  When is the Right Time to Upgrade Your PC? – Chris Pirillo.

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